Yamaha YDP142 VS Casio PX860 Review

Yamaha Arius YDP142 VS Casio Privia PX860

Check out new YDP 143 review (has comparison with YDP 142)

Yamaha YDP142 VS Casio PX860

Yamaha YDP142 VS Casio PX860

On this particular post we will compare two most versatile digital piano in the world. Yamaha YDP142 and the Casio PX860. Yamaha YDP142 is one of the signature product in the Yamaha Arius Series line and Casio PX860 is one of the signature product in the Casio Privia Series line. Most of pianists will be in dilemma of these two products(Yamaha YDP142 vs Casio PX860) during purchase. These two amazing digital pianos(Yamaha YDP142 vs Casio PX860) are even more difficult to compare as you get to know deeper about them. As you learn the remarkable detail of these two absolutely amazing pianos, you will feel even more perplexed.

This is where we come in to help: to guide you practically in your purchase decisions, focusing on applicable and practical aspects of digital pianos to show you full detail on benefits and gains with a complete disregard on ineligible traits that can only confuse the shoppers. This simple comparison will help you discern between Yamaha YDP142 Arius Series and Casio PX860 Privia Series. Your decision making in comparing digital piano will make a dramatic results.

 

Sound Comparison

  • Yamaha YDP142

Sound of Yamaha YDP142: Whereas Yamaha YDP142 Privia Series uses the sound samples from the Yamaha 9′ Concert Grand Piano CFIII.

Yamaha YDP142 has 128 Polyphony.Yamaha YDP142 has sound power of 12W X 12W=24W

3 different piano sounds:Concert, upright, bright.
plus 7 more sounds such as organ, string E-piano, harpsichord, vibraphone and more.

Low-pitched sounds are thick and grandeur and High-pitched sounds are pure, lively and clear-cut.
As a whole, the mixing of the sound is very well harmonized therefore the sound can be clear and beautiful during performance.

  • Casio PX860

Sound of Casio PX860: The sound of Casio PX860 Privia Series uses the “AiR Sound” System with smooth dynamic sounds upgrades from Casio PX850. Casio PX860’s AiR Sound produces great resonance.

Casio PX860 has 256 Polyphony.Casio PX860 Privia Series has sound-power output of  20W X 20W =40W

The sounds include Piano, E-Piano, string, organ, and other 13 different sounds.

Lid opens and closes like a real grand piano emulating the surround sound of an authentic grand piano.

Casio PX860 Privia Series’ “Stereo Resonance Simulator” system can naturally allow user to gain deep, beautiful resonance with use of damper pedal.

Keyboard Action Comparison

  • Yamaha YDP142

Keyboard Action of Yamaha YDP142:Yamaha YDP142 Arius Series keys are made of exceptional material of Polished Keys that are of high quality and is made to have a prestigious look and sophistication.

Yamaha YDP142 Arius Series  uses the 88-key Weighted Grade Hammer Action system.Yamaha YDP142 Arius Series uses the popular GHS action which is widely used in Yamaha digital pianos.Yamaha YDP142 Arius Series is made to match the acoustic piano: This means the lower note keys have heavier touch and keys become lighter as notes get higher.

Weight of the keys will feel lighter but responsiveness control is possible with the use of 3-sensor.

YDP142 Keys are smooth because they are polished keys

Yamaha YDP142 Keys are smooth because they are polished keys

  • Casio PX860

Keyboard Action of Casio PX860:Casio PX860 Privia Series’ keys are made of exceptional material of Ivory and Ebony keys that can be effective absorbent with even sweats on performers finger when played for an elongated hours.

Casio PX860 Privia Series’ unique action is 88-key Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action Keyboard which has same size and action as an acoustic piano.
This means the lower note keys have heavier touch and keys become lighter as notes get higher.Casio PX860 Privia Series  has no spring in the action making an emulation of grand piano action system instead of an upright piano which absolutely requires spring system.

Casio PX860 Privia Series  keyboard has 3-sensor that allow users to feel even the small strength changes in responsiveness.

Casio PX860 have ridges on the keys because they are Ivory Keys

Casio PX860 have ridges on the keys because they are Ivory Keys

Finish Comparison

  • Yamaha YDP142

Finishes of Yamaha YDP142: Yamaha YDP142 Arius Series is a Home-style digital piano with
stand, 3-pedal and bench included, so there aren’t many accessories necessary. However, headphones are optional.

3-Pedal of Yamaha YDP142 is has the length of 4 inches which emulates the same pedal size as an authentic acoustic pianos.

Yamaha Arius YDP142 3-Pedals

Yamaha Arius YDP142 3-Pedals

Yamaha YDP142 Arius Series has two different type of finishes:

  1. YDP-142B Black Walnut (Black)
  2. YDP-142R Dark Rosewood (Brown)
  • Casio PX860

Finishes of Casio PX860: Casio PX860 Privia Series  is a Home-style digital piano with stand and 3 pedal included and top of keyboard includes sliding cover. Bench can be bought additionally.

3-Pedal of Casio PX860 is the length of 3 inches which is a slim style..

Casio Privia PX860 3-Pedals

Casio Privia PX860 3-Pedals

Casio PX860 comes in three different type of finishes:

  1. Casio Privia PX-860BK Black wood tone finish(Black)
  2. Casio Privia PX-860BN Oak tone finish(Brown)
  3. Casio Privia PX-860WE White wood tone finish(White)

Function Comparison

  • Yamaha YDP142

Function of Yamaha YDP142:

  • Layer | With this technique, you can play two different sounds simultaneously on one key. You will be able to play ‘piano and string’ sound or ‘piano and organ’ sound simultaneously on one key. You will be able to make the performance more beautiful and will give you more enjoyment.layered_final
  • Duet Mode| You can divide the keyboard into two separate keyboards with the same chromatic scale. This is will become similar to playing two different pianos; it is fit for performance or a lesson between a student and a teacher.duetmode
  • Split | You can play two different instrument sound on each hand within a keyboard. For example, left hand can play vibraphone, right hand can play piano; it gives effect of one person playing two different instrument.split_final
  • Transpose | You can easily harmonize with different instruments. You can transpose within (-6 to 0, 0 to +6)
  • Sound | There are 3 different piano sounds: concert, upright, bright.
    Also includes 7 different sounds: Organ, string, electric piano, harpsichord, vibraphone and more.
  • Touch Sensitivity Control | You can control three different levels: Fixed, Medium and Hard
  • Here is a picture of function buttons on the Yamaha YDP142
    Yamaha YDP142 - Left

    Yamaha YDP142 – Left

    Yamaha YDP142 - Right

    Yamaha YDP142 – Right

  • Other functions include: record function, metronome function, and USB-TO-HOST. With USB-TO-HOST, you can use apps on ipads, iphones and connect to computer to use even more variety of functions.
  • For more of your information on YDP142 Function. Here is a function operation guide for the Yamaha YDP142. Pg.1
    YDP142: Function Operation Guide - pg. 1 -

    YDP142: Function Operation Guide – pg. 1 – “Click to View Larger”

    • Here is pg. 2

    YDP142: Function Operation Guide - pg. 2 -

    YDP142: Function Operation Guide – pg. 2 –“Click to view larger”

  • Casio PX860

Function of Casio PX860:

  • Layer |  With this technique, you can play two different sounds simultaneously on one key. You will be able to play ‘piano and string’ sound or ‘piano and organ’ sound simultaneously on one key. You will be able to make the performance more beautiful and will give you more enjoyment.layered_final
  • Duet Mode | You can divide the keyboard into two separate keyboards with the same chromatic scale. This is will become similar to playing two different pianos; it is fit for performance or a lesson between a student and a teacher.duetmode
  • Split | You can play two different instrument sound on each hand within a keyboard. For example, left hand can play vibraphone, right hand can play piano; it gives effect of one person playing two different instrument.split_final
  • Transpose | You can easily harmonize with different instruments.. You can transpose within 2 octaves (-12 ~ 0 ~ +12)
  • Sound | Piano sound includes concert, classic, modern, mellow, and bright; The 5 different sound can allow user to a much deeper self amusement.
    Other instrument sounds include E-Piano, string, organ, and other 13 different sounds as a basic option that can be supplemental to other instrumental studies.
  • Touch responsiveness control | You can control the strength of touch responsiveness.
  • Lesson function | 60 demo songs that can play divided hands: assisted left and right hand lessons to practice each hand before playing both hands simultaneously. Casio PX860 Privia Series  also has Concert Play function and 10 orchestra songs can allow learners to listen into orchestra as they play.
  • Here is a picture of function buttons on the Casio PX860
    Casio Privia PX860 - Left

    Casio Privia PX860 – Left

    Casio Privia PX860 - Right

    Casio Privia PX860 – Right

  • Other functions include recording, metronome, USB function and it has an OUT IN plug that can connect to another speaker. Casio PX860 Privia Series also has USB function that connects to computer and enjoy composition and computer music. Also, OUT INPUT Jack can allow connection to another amp and speaker that can allow a better sound power output.
  • For more of your information on PX860 Function. Here is a function operation guide for the Casio Privia PX860. Pg.1

    PX860: Specifications - pg. 1 -

    PX860: Specifications – pg. 1 – “Click to View Larger”

  • Here is pg. 2

    PX860: Specifications - pg. 2 -

    PX860: Specifications – pg. 2 – “Click to View Larger”

  • Here is pg. 3

    PX860: Specifications - pg. 3 -

    PX860: Specifications – pg. 3 – “Click to View Larger”

Warranty Comparison

Yamaha will provide 3-Year Parts & Labor Warranty
Casio will provide 3-Year Full-Replacement Warranty

Size & Weight Comparison

Yamaha YDP142 – (w x d x h) 53.44 x 16.63 x 32.06 in / 83.75 lbs
Casio PX860 – (w x d x h) 53.82 x 11.77 x 32.95 in / 78.26 lbs

Specification Comparison

Here is a picture of Specification for Yamaha YDP142

YDP142: Specifications - pg. 1 -

YDP142: Specifications – pg. 1 – “Click to View Larger”

YDP142: Specifications - pg. 2 -

YDP142: Specifications – pg. 2 – “Click to View Larger”

YDP142: Specifications - pg. 3 -

YDP142: Specifications – pg. 3 – “Click to View Larger”

Here is a picture of Specification for Casio PX860

PX860: Specifications - pg. 1 -

PX860: Specifications – pg. 1 – “Click to View Larger”

PX860: Specifications - pg. 2 -

PX860: Specifications – pg. 2 – “Click to View Larger”

Our recommendation based on our opinion:  Just be aware of the fact that this is our personal opinion based on facts. We do not unfairly recommend certain product in any biased ways. Personal preference may differ among different users.

  • Sound: Sound depends on customer preference. Most customers acknowledge, Yamaha YDP142 does have little bit more pristine and cleaner sound than Casio PX860. On the other hand, most customers acknowledge that Casio PX860 has deeper and smoother tones.
  • Style: Yamaha YDP142 has a similar finish as a acoustic piano. Casio PX860 has slim and modern style. It will just depend on personal preference.
  • Touch: This will depend on personal preference. Most customers acknowledge, Yamaha YDP142 has lighter keys than Casio PX860. Most customers acknowledge, Casio PX860 has heavier keys than Yamaha YDP142.
  • Function Controls: This will depend on personal preference and experience as well. Most customers acknowledge, Casio PX860 has convenient controls.

Other things to consider: Price…

-Yamaha -Arius– YDP 142– is priced at 1099.99
-Casio —-Privia– PX 860—- is priced at 1099.99

 


Click to see Casio PX860 Review
Click to see Yamaha YDP143 Review

22 thoughts on “Yamaha YDP142 VS Casio PX860 Review

  1. Great review !
    After a looking and reading about 6-7 digital pianos I ended with these two and when I googled the comparison between them… VOILA , this super useful review came up .

    I love the style and design of the Yamaha model , however the deeper sound of the Casio is more important to me .

    So far I am going towards the Casio but first could you please explain me this sentence : “Casio PX860 Privia Series has no spring in the action making an emulation of grand piano action system instead of an upright piano which absolutely requires spring system.”

    Best Regards 🙂

    • Upright pianos use the spring in their action system. Grand pianos uses action more like a seesaw (no spring). Upright and grand pianos have different action. Casio PX860 uses no spring, emulating the action system closer to a grand piano than an upright piano. 🙂

  2. It’s all about personal preference and need. If you compare similar models between yamaha and casio 9.5 out of 10 will come down to your personal preference. Overall as a company producing musical instruments there is no question that Yamaha has this covered. And from what I have seen in concerts or bands most of the time they use yamaha equipment.

    Personally I like the keybed action of the casio compared to yamahas GHS. However, I prefer the yamaha CF3s sound.

  3. I am still confused. They both seem good based on the comparison. I am a not-so-beginner user but rusty, if that makes sense. I’ll use this just to refresh my skills, and for my kiddo who will soon start to kearn how to play.

  4. This is one of the best comparison ever !!! thanks I’m from Mex I need to choose between this two models !! to be honest I love the yamaha sound but the casio has features that can make turn your head to it, Honestly I’m a Piano student (beginner) if you must recommend me one of those, which one will be and why ?? thanks. Note: in my country both of them has almost the same price.

  5. Ness, I am buying for my son who will be starting piano lessons. I don’t play myself. Which one did you get? and how do you like your selection? I am wondering if I should get the Yamaha because of the spring action since he most likely learn with an upright at the piano studio. Should I try to match what he will be learning from as much as possible?

    • Hell Anyi, I guess Ness will not revisit our blog and answer your question if he already purchased what he wants.
      You should definitely consider to purchase a piano that’s similar to grand piano with graded hammer action, not spring; and your son should get used to on the piano action that is original and professional.
      Both YDP 143 (142 is discontinued) and PX860 have graded hammer action.
      So you can consider their tone of sound (soft or bright or mellow), functions, and design. PX860 has slim design and YPD 143 has classical design.
      Both piano are excellet for beginner to advanced players

  6. Please could you tell me which one more closely simulates an upright piano in terms of key touch. Our son’s music teacher wants him to have a “real piano” at home, we are going for the electric option so as to have the earphone audio option. Which one would the teacher be happier with?

    • RL, I don’t recommend you to get piano that simulates upright piano. Upright piano has less resonance and just overall sound quality. In fact, Both YDP143(142 is discontinued) and PX860 have grand piano sampling.
      They both have graded hammer action just like grand piano. They both support headphon option. So you can now just consider design (px860 = modern slim style, ydp143 = normal classic style), color, tonality of sound, key touch, and function. I cannot recommend you specific product because everyone has different taste. Both pianos are good quality piano so the teacher will be satisfied.

  7. Thank you very much. It’s the best comparison I red. I am in the same situation of some other comments, I am looking for a piano for my house, for my son because he is starting piano lessons, and also for myself (I’m consired a “beginner”). I was a looking for the Casio PxS5 but for what I understood it is more for pro players and for playing in public. Could you tell me is for my case it would be better de Pxs5 or one of these pianos (px860 and ydp143). And also could you explain me in more detail which you consider better (px860 or ydp143) in terms of key touch?

    • Hello Juan, it really depends on the players’ taste. 143 has GHS action with matte top, and 860 has Tri-SSHAKII with ivory keys. And I’m pretty sure they both have same number of sensitivity (which is 3). So you just need to try them both.

  8. I’ve been in the market for a digital piano and have narrowed it down to these exact 2 pianos. I went to Guitar Center a few days ago hoping to test them out and was happy to find both models side-by-side in the showroom. I’ve got to say, based on reviews, videos, and everything else I’ve seen online, I was pretty sure I was going to go with the Yamaha but just wanted to check them out in person before making my final decision.

    Based on aesthetics alone, I really preferred the look of the Yamaha over the Casio. It just looked a bit cleaner and elegant. For instance, the power buttons, knobs, red lights, etc were on the far left side and out of playing-view. The Casio looked a bit more busy with all kinds of lights, knobs, and buttons that are placed front and center, right beneath the music stand. Not a huge deal, but just kind of felt like staring at control knobs and indicator lights while playing might act as a constant reminder that I’m not actually playing a “real piano”. Don’t get me wrong, the Casio looked pretty nice, but my daughter and I both agreed the Yamaha looked better.

    That being said about the aesthetics, I was really hoping that I would like the sound and feel of the Yamaha better. Unfortunately, that was not the case. They both sounded great, so I really have no preference in this department. However, the keys on the Casio felt much more realistic and had a heavier feel to them. The Yamaha keys felt a bit too springy. My daughter also felt the same. Man, I really wanted to like the Yamaha better and was ready to purchase it, but now I’m pretty sure I’m going to go ahead and buy the Casio PX-860… hopefully its looks will grow on me over time.

    I am not trying to persuade you to purchase the Casio over the Yamaha. Heck, you may go check them both out and come to the exact opposite conclusion. Therefore, my advice to you is, before you make a final decision, I highly recommend taking the time to go check them both out in person, if possible. If not possible, just go with your gut… you probably won’t be disappointed with either choice =)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s